Walk-in[g] Shop

Competition

2010

Walk-in[g] Shop received 2nd place in the "Out of Box ANCI Italian Shoe Competition".

Walkin[g] Shop redefines the shopping experience.

Anywhere you are:
Everyone around the world relishes in the iconic image of the Italian shoe. With brick and mortar shops on the way out and the Internet not always at your disposal ñ retail still needs face time with the consumer. The Walk-in[g] Shop makes this possible. If you cannot travel to your favorite Italian Shoe Shop in Milan, the Walk-in[g] Shop can come to you.

Geographically transient, the modular system of Walk-in[g] Shop adapts to any city, any store, anywhere. The complete system can walk itself from concept to production to assembly to display.

Shoe design is continually expanding and adapting to consumer needs and must be able to keep up with demand. The Walk-in[g] Shop maintains this continuous production and influx of a single pair of shoes from the factory to the foot. Rather than the consumer walking to the store, the walk-in[g] store brings the individuality of the Italian Shoe to the international connoisseur. Whether youíre in Milan, Tokyo, New York or Paris ñ the iconic Italian Shoe consumes the geography of the world.

The Display:
Packaging on shipping containers that become display register the necessary information for consumers to be aware of the trends all over the world at any moment. Via creation of a system of flexible modules that are packaged, shipped and displayed, the Italian shoe display becomes a universal expression of Italian culture anywhere in the world. Shoe towers pop up in cities and in turn, each city is connected to the universal Italian Walk-in[g] Shop.

Daily, consumers are aware of what is being sold around the world, what is a favorite, and what is sold out with just a click of a button.

Packaging to Assembly:
The modular structure is comprised of a panel system born out of the euro pallet dimensions of 80x120 cm. The traditional storing mechanism of boxing is replaced with the panel system. From the production line, shoes are stored in the egg-crate cast panels, shipped to their destination and are immediately ready to be locked into place for display. The panels are assembled on site and become the display for the shoes. After usage, the panels are easily dissembled and put back on pallets to then be shipped to a new destination.

Liron Cohen, architect